Pagoda suspends price hike

June 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Myanmar, News

YANGON, 6 June 2017: Shwedagon Pagoda’s board of trustees has suspended its plan to increase entrance fees for foreigners from 8,000 kyats to 10,000 kyats.

Irrawaddy media reported the board planned to increase the fees from the beginning of June. The announcement had been made in early May.

The Union of Myanmar Travel Association (UMTA) told the Ministry of Religious Affairs and Culture that the new rate would impact package tour operators, as packages were sold a year in advance.

The ministry told the board that proposals regarding admission fees in cultural heritage zones must be made to the Department of Archaeology, National Museum and Library six months in advance and approval to such proposals must be sought from the ministry.

The UMTA urged member companies, last week, to prepare calculations for the new prices for their future packages.

For January to April this year, 40,789 foreign tourists—mostly from Thailand, China, Germany, France and Japan—visited, the report said.

Shwedagon Pagoda is  one of the main tourist attractions of Yangon and an iconic landmark usually featured in skyline visuals of the city.

Visitors to Shwedagon pagoda started to pay the entrance fee in Myanmar kyat instead of US dollars from April 2014.

Comments

One Response to “Pagoda suspends price hike”
  1. Joe Blo says:

    Dual pricing, the scourge of foreign travelers to many Asian countries. I wonder how Asian visitors would respond to dual pricing (other than discounts that residents in certain states of some countries may receive) if they were asked to pay more for admission to tourist sites in western countries?

    In any case, it wasn’t long ago that the entrance fee for foreign visitors to Shwedagon was 5000 Kyat. In the old days when foreigners were requested to pay in US$, it was US$5 but the exchange rate in those days was lower than it is now. This proposal has all the markings of price gouging. 10,000 Kyat is no small price to pay for a temple that you can photograph for free from outside, especially if you’re a backpacker.